this is my blog's alter ego. I tumbl quotes, graphs, science-y things, and quite a lot of harry potter/doctor who/etc/etc. Sometimes I also pin, and tweet, and find crafty things to do.

“The world’s beauty is in soap bubbles, little specks of dust, galaxy shards, tiny things swept under the rugs that we stomp on day after day because we’re too busy to notice small treasures...The busy ghost presses his hands into my back and pushes me one way or the other to do this or that. I want to stop to see, to think, to breathe. I want to put my ear to the soil and listen for the ants. I want to daydream, fly a kite, run my hands through thick, green grass...” (Ophelia Blooming)

Photo from here. Wanna ask me something?
nationalgeographicmagazine:

Blue Pond, Hokkaido Photograph by Kent Shiraishi, My ShotThe “blue pond” of the famous tourist resort in Biei, Hokkaido, Japan is a place where many tourists gather in spring, summer, and autumn. However, since this pond freezes in winter, nobody is there during that period. This photograph was taken during the first snow of the season as it fell over the blue pond.
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nationalgeographicmagazine:

Blue Pond, Hokkaido
Photograph by Kent Shiraishi, My Shot
The “blue pond” of the famous tourist resort in Biei, Hokkaido, Japan is a place where many tourists gather in spring, summer, and autumn. However, since this pond freezes in winter, nobody is there during that period. This photograph was taken during the first snow of the season as it fell over the blue pond.

Download Wallpaper (1600 x 1200 pixels)

mohandasgandhi:

An Ocean Miracle in the Gulf of California

For generations we have been taking fish out of the ocean at a rate  faster than they can reproduce. The problem is that there are fewer and  fewer fish to meet an ever-increasing demand. The solution is simply to  take less so that we can continue eating fish for a longer time.
Opponents of conservation, however, argue that regulating fishing  will destroy jobs and hurt the economy–but they are wrong, and there are  real-world examples that prove this. A scientific study published today  by the Public Library of Science shows that protecting an area brings the fish back, and creates jobs  and increases economic revenue for the local communities. I have seen it  with my own eyes and, believe me, it is like a miracle, only that it is  not–it’s just common business sense.
Cabo Pulmo National Park in Baja California, Mexico, was protected in  1995 to safeguard the largest coral community in the Gulf of  California. When I dove there for the first time in 1999, I thought the  corals were very nice, but there were not so many fishes, and I didn’t  think the place was extraordinary. Together with Octavio Aburto and  other Mexican colleagues we dove at many sites in the gulf, in a region  spanning over 1,000 km. Cabo Pulmo was just like most other places I’d  seen in the Gulf of California.
But the Cabo Pulmo villagers wanted more. They decided that the  waters in front of their settlement were going to be a no-take marine  reserve – fishing was banned with the hopes of bringing the fish back.  They had a vision, and they succeeded in a way that exceeded all  expectations, including mine.
In 2009 we went back to Cabo Pulmo to monitor the fish populations.  We jumped in the water, expecting fishes to be more abundant after 10  years of protection. But we could not believe what we saw–thousands upon  thousands of large fishes such as snappers, groupers, trevally, and  manta rays. They were so abundant that we could not see each other if we  were fifteen meters apart. We saw more sharks in one dive at Cabo Pulmo  than in 10 years of diving throughout the Gulf of California!
Our research indicated that the fish biomass increased by 460% at Cabo  Pulmo–to a level similar to remote pristine coral reefs that have never  been fished. In contrast, all other sites in the Gulf of California that  we revisited in 2009 were as degraded as ten years earlier. This shows  that it is possible to bring back the former richness of the ocean that  man has obliterated, but that without our dedication, the degradation  will continue.
Most importantly for the people of Cabo Pulmo, since their reef is  now the only healthy reef left in the Gulf of California, it has  attracted divers, which bring economic revenue. And fishermen around the  marine reserve are catching more fish than before thanks to the  spillover of fish from the no-take marine reserve. It seems like a  win-win to me!
The question is: how can we have more of these?

Environmental sustainability is possible.

This is what I like to see!

View in High Quality →

mohandasgandhi:

An Ocean Miracle in the Gulf of California

For generations we have been taking fish out of the ocean at a rate faster than they can reproduce. The problem is that there are fewer and fewer fish to meet an ever-increasing demand. The solution is simply to take less so that we can continue eating fish for a longer time.

Opponents of conservation, however, argue that regulating fishing will destroy jobs and hurt the economy–but they are wrong, and there are real-world examples that prove this. A scientific study published today by the Public Library of Science shows that protecting an area brings the fish back, and creates jobs and increases economic revenue for the local communities. I have seen it with my own eyes and, believe me, it is like a miracle, only that it is not–it’s just common business sense.

Cabo Pulmo National Park in Baja California, Mexico, was protected in 1995 to safeguard the largest coral community in the Gulf of California. When I dove there for the first time in 1999, I thought the corals were very nice, but there were not so many fishes, and I didn’t think the place was extraordinary. Together with Octavio Aburto and other Mexican colleagues we dove at many sites in the gulf, in a region spanning over 1,000 km. Cabo Pulmo was just like most other places I’d seen in the Gulf of California.

But the Cabo Pulmo villagers wanted more. They decided that the waters in front of their settlement were going to be a no-take marine reserve – fishing was banned with the hopes of bringing the fish back. They had a vision, and they succeeded in a way that exceeded all expectations, including mine.

In 2009 we went back to Cabo Pulmo to monitor the fish populations. We jumped in the water, expecting fishes to be more abundant after 10 years of protection. But we could not believe what we saw–thousands upon thousands of large fishes such as snappers, groupers, trevally, and manta rays. They were so abundant that we could not see each other if we were fifteen meters apart. We saw more sharks in one dive at Cabo Pulmo than in 10 years of diving throughout the Gulf of California!

Our research indicated that the fish biomass increased by 460% at Cabo Pulmo–to a level similar to remote pristine coral reefs that have never been fished. In contrast, all other sites in the Gulf of California that we revisited in 2009 were as degraded as ten years earlier. This shows that it is possible to bring back the former richness of the ocean that man has obliterated, but that without our dedication, the degradation will continue.

Most importantly for the people of Cabo Pulmo, since their reef is now the only healthy reef left in the Gulf of California, it has attracted divers, which bring economic revenue. And fishermen around the marine reserve are catching more fish than before thanks to the spillover of fish from the no-take marine reserve. It seems like a win-win to me!

The question is: how can we have more of these?

Environmental sustainability is possible.

This is what I like to see!

neeeeew look. with this photo. I love it, it calms me so.

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neeeeew look. with this photo. I love it, it calms me so.

silent-fiction:

Steve McCurry, Kashmir Flower Seller, 1993 (via Seoul Art Fiend)

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silent-fiction:

Steve McCurry, Kashmir Flower Seller, 1993 (via Seoul Art Fiend)

(Source: reblololo)

Apr 3rd at 2PM / via: snowsnow004 / op: reblololo / tagged: water. paddle. blue. green. tree. lush. flower. color. orange. pink. nature. / reblog / 300 notes
astoldbykara:

my goodness! I can’t see the damn filter.
lickystickypickyme:

World’s smallest aquarium:
Craftsman Anatoly Konenko is responsible for the smallest aquarium in the world. A glass cube  measuring 30 x 24 x 14 mm, filled with multicolor stones and sand,  contains 10 ml of water for a tiny fish. It also has a little water  purification filter to keep the water healthy for fish.
Konenko has been fiddling around with micro-miniatures for 30 years – he  was the first such craftsman in Siberia. He worked out how to write on  rice grains, poppy seeds even human hair, and created the necessary  micro-instruments to do this.
wow.

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astoldbykara:

my goodness! I can’t see the damn filter.

lickystickypickyme:

World’s smallest aquarium:

Craftsman Anatoly Konenko is responsible for the smallest aquarium in the world. A glass cube measuring 30 x 24 x 14 mm, filled with multicolor stones and sand, contains 10 ml of water for a tiny fish. It also has a little water purification filter to keep the water healthy for fish.

Konenko has been fiddling around with micro-miniatures for 30 years – he was the first such craftsman in Siberia. He worked out how to write on rice grains, poppy seeds even human hair, and created the necessary micro-instruments to do this.

wow.

(Source: lickystickypickyshe)

Mar 5th at 12PM / via: snowsnow004 / op: lickystickypickyshe / tagged: fish. water. tiny. mini. wow. / reblog / 732 notes
"1ℓimit faucet looks more like an elegant test tube inverted on top of a tap. The glass tube holds exactly one liter of water, sufficient for a quick handwash. The theory being that we waste almost six liters of water and use only one, while washing hands. Once the stored one-liter is used up, you have to turn-off the tap till the next one liter fills up the tube. A cumbersome rationing process that will hopefully drive home the point of conservation!" -One Liter Limited

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"1ℓimit faucet looks more like an elegant test tube inverted on top of a tap. The glass tube holds exactly one liter of water, sufficient for a quick handwash. The theory being that we waste almost six liters of water and use only one, while washing hands. Once the stored one-liter is used up, you have to turn-off the tap till the next one liter fills up the tube. A cumbersome rationing process that will hopefully drive home the point of conservation!" -One Liter Limited

View in High Quality →

Feb 8th at 10PM / via: yzzie / op: yzzie / tagged: blue. water. ocean. branch. / reblog / 7 notes