this is my blog's alter ego. I tumbl quotes, graphs, science-y things, and quite a lot of harry potter/doctor who/etc/etc. Sometimes I also pin, and tweet, and find crafty things to do.

“The world’s beauty is in soap bubbles, little specks of dust, galaxy shards, tiny things swept under the rugs that we stomp on day after day because we’re too busy to notice small treasures...The busy ghost presses his hands into my back and pushes me one way or the other to do this or that. I want to stop to see, to think, to breathe. I want to put my ear to the soil and listen for the ants. I want to daydream, fly a kite, run my hands through thick, green grass...” (Ophelia Blooming)

Photo from here. Wanna ask me something?
motherjones:

Chart of the Day: The amount that students owe quintupled between 2000 and 2011. For more, check out our MoJo College Guide.

Glad I could be a part of something bigger than myself…??

motherjones:

Chart of the Day: The amount that students owe quintupled between 2000 and 2011. For more, check out our MoJo College Guide.

Glad I could be a part of something bigger than myself…??

Sep 15th at 9AM / via: ilovecharts / op: motherjones / tagged: education. news. charts. college. debt. loans. ilovecharts. / reblog / 1,527 notes
Science News For Kids!
 

Science News for Kids was launched in 2003 by Society for Science & the Public (SSP) as a youth edition and companion to SSP’s Science News magazine.
SSP is a nonprofit membership organization based in Washington, D.C. Founded in 1921, and first known as Science Service, SSP advances the popular understanding of science through publications and educational programs.

These are science articles written for students, both in subject matter and writing style. For example, this article, Dolphin dimples detect electricity, starts out with a fun, inviting air:

A person can use all five senses while spending time with dolphins. We can see them frolic in the waves, hear them call and splash, and feel their rubbery skin. We can sniff dolphins, though they don’t have much of an odor. And those willing to get close enough for a lick could find out what dolphins taste like.

Read the rest here.

View in High Quality →

Science News For Kids!

Science News for Kids was launched in 2003 by Society for Science & the Public (SSP) as a youth edition and companion to SSP’s Science News magazine.

SSP is a nonprofit membership organization based in Washington, D.C. Founded in 1921, and first known as Science Service, SSP advances the popular understanding of science through publications and educational programs.

These are science articles written for students, both in subject matter and writing style. For example, this article, Dolphin dimples detect electricity, starts out with a fun, inviting air:

A person can use all five senses while spending time with dolphins. We can see them frolic in the waves, hear them call and splash, and feel their rubbery skin. We can sniff dolphins, though they don’t have much of an odor. And those willing to get close enough for a lick could find out what dolphins taste like.

Read the rest here.

Study: City bike sharing programs save lives, reduce carbon emissions →

plantedcity:

From Reuters:

Public bicycle sharing schemes such as Barcelona’s “Bicing” program or London’s “Boris Bikes” save lives and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, according to a study on Friday.

Bike schemes are becoming increasingly popular in cities around the world, with more than 360 already running, but their main aim is usually to ease congestion rather than boost health. 

Researchers at the Center for Research in Environmental Epidemiology in Barcelona found in a study, however, that around 9,000 tons of carbon dioxide pollution are averted and some 12 lives saved each year by Barcelona’s scheme, which was introduced in March 2007.

“Active transport policies such as bike sharing systems promote physical activity among the population and are a good means to improve public health and also reduce expenses in public health services,” said David Rojas-Rueda, whose study was published in the British Medical Journal.

The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends adults should do at least 150 minutes of moderate exercise a week and says this could be done by walking for 30 minutes five times per week, or by cycling to work every day.

The researchers said this initial assessment suggested it was important “to encourage cities to change car use by cycling and stimulate the implementation of bike sharing systems in cities to improve the health of the population.”

Check out the rest of the article, including details about London and Barcelona’s bike share systems, here. For an overview of the rapid growth of bike sharing programs around the world take a look at National Geographic’s recent article, ‘Bike share Schemes Shift Into High Gear’. Ride on!

(Photo credit: Inhabitat)

jtotheizzoe:

Perry’s God Strategy May Be Effective. Science Explains Why
Social psychologists from Duke found that the when devout people view their government as in turmoil, they turn to God to fill the gaps in trust:

“Although there are undoubtedly multiple causes of religious belief, one cause may be that when people perceive their government as unstable, they turn to God or other religious deities to fulfill a need for order and control in their lives,” says Aaron Kay, an associate professor at Duke University.

Rick Perry and his prayer rally (which was well-received among attendees) is likely be capitalizing on those feelings, inadvertently or not. When religious Americans view the nation’s problems as “beyond our power to solve”, their psychology points them to candidates that share their trust in a higher power.
(via The Intersection)

View in High Quality →

jtotheizzoe:

Perry’s God Strategy May Be Effective. Science Explains Why

Social psychologists from Duke found that the when devout people view their government as in turmoil, they turn to God to fill the gaps in trust:

“Although there are undoubtedly multiple causes of religious belief, one cause may be that when people perceive their government as unstable, they turn to God or other religious deities to fulfill a need for order and control in their lives,” says Aaron Kay, an associate professor at Duke University.

Rick Perry and his prayer rally (which was well-received among attendees) is likely be capitalizing on those feelings, inadvertently or not. When religious Americans view the nation’s problems as “beyond our power to solve”, their psychology points them to candidates that share their trust in a higher power.

(via The Intersection)

Aug 14th at 11AM / via: jtotheizzoe / op: jtotheizzoe / tagged: science. politics. government. news. perry. prayer. gop. / reblog / 91 notes